Hungarian noble family dating from the middle ages

The three religious groups together make up 92.9 percent of the population.

A term commonly used to designate that period of European history between the fall of the Roman Empire and about the middle of the fifteenth century.

Any hard and fast line drawn to designate either the beginning or close of the period in question is arbitrary.

It had a flourishing culture, comprising part of the larger Gaelic-speaking world and an economy dominated by agriculture and trade.

After the twelfth-century reign of King David I, the Scottish monarchs are better described as Scoto-Norman than Gaelic, preferring French culture to native Scottish culture.

By the tenth and eleventh centuries, northern Great Britain was increasingly dominated by Gaelic culture, and by the Gaelic regal lordship of Alba, known in Latin as either Albania or Scotia, and in English as "Scotland".

From its base in the east, this kingdom acquired control of the lands lying to the south and ultimately the west and much of the north.