Dating people at work

But sometimes, that's way easier said than done — especially if your job requires you to spend long hours and tight cubicles with the same person.Tempting (and steamy) as it may be, it can also turn out to be super awkward and traumatic — something we all saw unfold on the first season of 1. Like in the "think about it for a few extra days" way, not in the literal sense. Will you be peering around corners to make sure your former love isn't in the hall and avoiding the company picnic for fear your ex will flaunt a new love interest? Before you throw your next promotion to the wind, here are five reasons dating your coworker might not be such a good idea. Reality Unfortunately, this is not a tale by the Brothers Grimm, so you can't count on a happy ending.And when coworkers eventually find out, you may be the subject of ridicule and suspicion: If you want people to focus on your professional abilities, don't give them reasons to fuel the rumor mill.Are you willing to live with the regret of not knowing? No need to go into details about your feelings for bae, but do tell your boss that the relationship won't interfere with your work performance. Rather than turning it into the source of all office gossip in perpetuity, use discretion when telling your coworkers. Keep your attention where it should be during office hours.It seems like everyone has a cautionary tale of a relationship in a workplace that went terribly, terribly wrong.Work-based relationships aren’t always superficial and it is almost inevitable that at some point in your career you’ll develop a crush on someone at work.

Suddenly, Cupid shoots his arrow, and it hits the person in the next office. If things do work out, one of you may have to go, because it's against company policy to date fellow employees. Let's say you become involved with someone in your department, and you receive a promotion. Better start popping extra vitamins and heighten your sense of discretion.

If the rumor mill goes into high gear, that might be the right time.

If nobody seems to notice, there's no reason to share. You and your new partner need to agree on some ground rules and come up with a plan for how you will keep it professional and stay within written or unwritten rules. "You may have the burden of overcompensating with professionalism and keeping an artificial distance, which can be an awkward strain," says Taylor.

" Those are questions I'm frequently asked when I tell people the story of my office romance.

Before you risk hurting your reputation at work, find out if this person is someone you'd want to spend weekends with. People either don't care, will think it's obnoxious or inappropriate, or will get jealous. Once you have a sense that this might have a future, talk to your partner and decide how and when you want to disclose your relationships to your colleagues.